Temperature too high

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I posted this as a reply to another question, but decided it needs to be a new question.

I am in Prescott AZ where the temperature in the direct sun may be 104, whale the temperature in the shade is 90. 

I have checked the fan and it is clean with no debris.  It runs in the direct sun but it does not seem to be able to cool the inside of the 5-in-1 to give accurate results.  I have followed all of the troubleshooting suggestions like removing the batteries, moving the ABC switch back and forth, etc.   I have looked at the temperature sensor and it is clean.   

 Is there a way to use a separate temperature sensor mounted out of direct sunlight? 
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Rich Press

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Posted 1 year ago

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Jack Canavera

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Yes a lot of the display screens have the capability of monitoring other sensors.  For example I have a 01536 CDI to monitor my 5-in-1.  I also have a stand alone sensor https://www.acurite.com/temperature-and-humidity-sensor-06002rm-592txr.html which is mounted under the deck in the shade below my 5-in-1.   I have my display configured so that the indoor/humidity readings show for a few seconds and then flip to the remote sensor's outdoor temperature and humidity readings.  It even shows the channel setting it is on.  You don't set the display panel to the same channel setting as the sensor.  So my 5-in-1 and display screen is set to B.  The remote sensor is set to C.  This display screen when showing the remote sensor's readings will also display that it it picking up the signal from channel C.  Works pretty neat.  My smartHUB also has the ability to pick up that sensor so that sensor is also displayed on the myacrite.com page along with the 5-in-1.
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Rich Press

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How did you configure the readout to look at the remote temperature sensor without seeing the 5-in-1 at the same time?
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Jack Canavera

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Well the display has an area for indoor temp and humidity. At the bottom of the display are two buttons, one with up and one with down indicators. Pushing the buttons will show you additional sensors that are in range of the display. Enough pushes will give you a circular arrow display on the screen. When that arrow displays then the display will cycle automatically between indoor info and other sensor data. Other displays may differ so check your display manual for procedures.
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AcuRite Jennifer

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Hello Rich,

There are only certain displays that will show additional sensors. If you have the 01036 that you entered in the post information when creating the post it will not show additional sensors. We have replied on your other forum thread requesting additional information as well. I have posted it below. 

 
Where is the sensor mounted?  How high do you have the sensor mounted?  When the sun hits the solar panel you should hear a slight hum coming from the sensor. Do you hear the hum?  Do you have the single or dual solar assembly on the sensor?
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Kevin Baker

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I replaced my single solar assembly on AcuRite Model 01536 5-in-1 array with the dual solar assembly and still have daytime temperature readings running 3 to 5 degrees warmer than neighboring stations (less than 100 feet elevation difference from my location).  I can hear the fan running inside the unit and have cleaned the unit thoroughly. 

My station is located 15-20 feet away from the west side of my house and about 10 feet east of a 5-foot brick wall. If the station was getting too much radiative heat from the house or brick wall, it shouldn't be reading consistently too high (within 3-5 degrees) as solar radiation from these outside sources changes as the day progresses.  When the sun is directly overhead, I would think it would receive less heating influence from the house or wall, but the gravel could be a bigger factor.  I have noticed that when the sun is shaded by clouds, the temperature definitely reads much closer to neighboring stations.

I feel I have narrowed the problem down to station location (about 5.5 feet above an open gravel covered backyard attached to a 6 foot metal pole) or inadequately ventilated temperature sensor.  I lean toward the latter problem, but am not convinced.  It would be interesting to purchase another temperature sensor and place in a shaded ventilated location nearby and see the difference.  

One other note, I have viewed the station location of my nearest neighbor that consistently reads cooler than me, and his 5-in-1 is actually situated on top of a brick wall, so should be getting even more radiation than my sensor array.
(Edited)
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Jon008

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What you are doing wrong is comparing your sensor to surrounding ones. They may be in the shade of a thick tree, which would not be accurate.You can move around any property and usually get several degrees difference, especially from sun to shade. The outdoor temperature is supposed to be taken in the open with exposed sky in the sun.
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Kevin Baker

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Yes, my station is in a wide open fully exposed space that receives direct sunlight most of the day. The comparison station (closest to me) is also exposed to full sunshine with no trees nearby. His 5 in 1 sensor array is mounted on top of a brick wall. Still shouldn't see that much difference in temperature. I used to site weather sensors in my profession, but never over a gravel field as I have now, so thinking that might be a bigger factor than previously thought.
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AcuRite Jennifer

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Hello Kevin,

We would recommend increasing the height of the sensor, and see what the readings become when the height is increased. When comparing temperature, humidity or other environmental readings against other sources to determine accuracy, the comparative source MUST be in the exact same location where the original measurement is taken. 

Information on the television, radio, computer, or mobile app is NOT a valid source for comparison, because environmental factors fluctuate a great deal between different locations. Data from these sources may be for locations that are several miles away from where you're taking a reading.

When testing a product against another product for accuracy, be sure to allow products to sit undisturbed (without handling) side by side for a minimum of 30 minutes to allow the products to acclimate to the environmental conditions. 1-8 hours is ideal for humidity testing. Also be sure to take into account the accuracy standard/tolerance for different products.
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Jack Canavera

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I've got a 5-in-1 mounted on a corner rail of my deck about 10 feet from the house.  The 5-in-1 extends enough so directly below it is grass.  It gets sun exposure in the summer most of the day from sunrise to about 1 hour before sunset.  Winter it spends most of it's life in the shade.  I also have an Acurite Temperature/Humidity sensor mounted below the deck about 2 feet from the house.  Under the deck is a concrete patio.  The under deck sensor gets no direct sun exposure.  There is a neighbor about 100 feet from me that has a 5-in-1 mounted on his yard storage shed eve.  

I find it interesting to see the variance in the measured outdoor temperatures based on seasons of the year, condition of the skies, and wind speed.  Essentially wind plays a big factor in that my 5-in-1 and below deck sensor will vary by 2-4 degrees on sunny days.  Dependent upon wind direction where the house is not blocking the prevailing breeze, I can see the gap between direct sun and shade temperatures be very little or non existent.  I see my neighbor's 5-in-1 affected by his storage building roof temps dependent upon wind direction and speed.  Typically our 5-in-1's don't vary more than .5 of a degree unless he starts getting heat from the shed roof.

Other interesting observations are that in the summer on cloudy days my under deck sensor and 5-in-1 will almost be in lock step on temperatures.  In the winter the below deck sensor always shows warmer due to it's placement being closer to my home.  If the wind is blowing temps of both units will again be almost the same.

Humidity measurements are interesting in that my 5-in-1 shows higher humidity at night due to it sensing the air over grass.  The concrete under my deck shows a dryer climate.  Again if the wind stirs the air, things tend to even out.

Another observation with the 5-in-1 is that it really needs that direct sun hit to my single solar panel to get the fan running.  In the summer my temps rises unusually fast compared to surrounding stations and I may be 5 degrees off of other weather stations in the area.  Once the sun angle gets a little higher I notice that my temperature stabilizes and the other weather stations in the area catch up with me.  Having the dual solar panels would probably help that morning variance since we would get a better angle on the morning sun thus helping that fan start earlier in the day.

I guess my entire point is that unless you know the conditions of the stations reporting temperatures, you do need to consider station variances with a wary eye.   My brother in law also has a 5-in-1 so I'm monitoring 3, 5-in-1 units within a one mile area and If I didn't know the peculiarities of each of their locations, I'd probably go nuts wondering why things sometimes aren't more in sync.  

I definitely do realize though that the single solar panel 5-in-1 assuming that the fan is running properly, may display higher temperature results than a dual panel unit both sitting in wide open space, dependent upon the season of the year and your geographical location, and the time of day.  Sometimes that angle of the sun may not be enough to provide enough voltage for that fan to turn, even though you may be in full sunlight.  I've seen this with my single panel.  I have a feeling that that morning variance with other weather stations in my area is probably why WU hasn't given me my gold star, but for all intents that's not enough of a driving force to get me to pony up for the dual panel upgrade.
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