I have a AcuRite 02032CRM coming in the mail. Looks like there is a round sleeve in the unit. What size pipe does it accept? Thanks

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I have a AcuRite 02032CRM coming in the mail. Would like to get a head start installing it. Looks like there is a round sleeve in the unit. What size pipe does it accept? Thanks
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gdjoslin

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Posted 3 years ago

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Harold Ashe, Champion

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You can either mount the sensor using the included grey plastic bracket by first screwing it into a post or board and then sliding the sensor over it or using a 3/4" overall diameter galvanized pipe.  The pipe will fit the hole in the sensor perfectly and, in that case, you won't need the bracket.  The only problem you might have with the pipe option is that the little self-tapping screws won't penetrate the pipe unless you pre-drill a hole to accommodate one of the screws.

I don't recommend a PVC pipe because they tend to sway in high winds and could cause false rainfall readings.
(Edited)
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gdjoslin

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I live a distance from town. Was trying to find out the correct size so I can have it on hand when the weather stations arrives. Thanks
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Mark Wood

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Mine fits a 1" OD PVC pipe perfectly. I used guy wires to stabilize it..
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Clint1583

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I just recently mounted my 5-1 on a 3/4" pipe. I used a 18" pipe along with an elbow and 6" piece. Worked out great.
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Clint1583

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I can't seem to flip the picture but you get the idea.
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AcuRite Kevin

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Hi Clint,

Thanks for sharing!  Looks great! 
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Derrick Wong

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3/4" (galvanized) pipe. Need to drill into the pipe and get self-tapping metal screws to attach to pipe.
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gdjoslin

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Thanks looks bigger in the photo. That helps alt.
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hafcanadian A

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The included mounting bracket is 3/4" inside, 1" outside diameter. The bottom hole in the head fits over that bracket, which is why it looks bigger than 3/4" to you... it is.
 So a galvanized steel pipe that's labeled "3/4" " is actually the same as the bracket, 3/4" I.O. and 1" O.D., and will fit the head. So you won't be able use the bracket as a base for a pole as some might think - the hole in the head is 1", but the hole is only 3/4" in the bracket.  The plastic wouldn't be strong enough for much of a pole anyway - it is meant for the head to be directly mounted to it.

As others note, you'll have to drill and tap a hole in the pipe for a set screw because the holes they put in the head aren't threaded... I had some trouble with that when I had to change something and the screw had frozen in place; I couldn't get the head off. That was fun trying to drill the set screw out with the plastic head in place, and not mess up the plastic. So approach that part of the job with caution.  As others mention, you could use self-tapping screws, but I had trouble with them cutting into the pipe without snapping.  And I broke off one tap likewise.  The holes in the plastic head are for just too small a screw diameter;  as I recall I enlarged one hole accordingly.  It would be nice to bolt through with a locking cap nut, but the head isn't formed to allow that option.

The manual talks about using 2 included screws to fasten the head to the mounting bracket/base, but they are different sizes and I found no corresponding holes in the bracket. Apparently your are supposed to force the screws to cut their own holes in the bracket, and why they're differing sizes I don't know. I found the whole thing a bit uncertain - the instructions could be a little more enlightening. I think that if there was a metal sleeve instead in the head, with threaded holes, or one threaded and one not, then one could either screw into a pole substrate of any type, or use a set screw to clamp to a metal pole without having to drill and tap anything.

I was tempted by PVC, but I used a ten foot galvanized pipe because PVC would sway in the wind and likely throw readings off. I used a so-called 3/4" galvanized elbow and floor plate to mount the pipe to the side of a 4X4 post. A couple pipe wall brackets on wood standoffs above the elbow help keep the pipe from rotating out of square; and by removing those, the pipe rotates on the elbow right down to ground level where I can service the head when needed.

Now, just hope lightning isn't attracted to the thing sticking 14 feet into the air... ;)
(Edited)
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AcuRite Kevin

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Hi gdjoslin,

There is some very good information posted above to get you started!  Here is a link to our 5-in-1 Sensor Installation Guidelines.





hafcanadian A, your mounting sounds impressive; would you be willing to post some pictures of your handiwork?  Also, with that 14ft installation, you may wish to consider grounding wires. 
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hafcanadian A

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Sure, here's a few pix.
Note:  I was originally going to mount the head to the side or roof of the shed, but was concerned about wind direction and speed interference, and heat and splashback interference from the building.  My goal was to get the device higher up with as little influence from surrounding structures as possible.  Houses and trees nearby were insurmountable, but all-in-all it seems to read and report conditions quite well.  

On very hot days it still leans about 4-5 degrees higher than what temps probably actually are, but that's a lot better than the previous head that was up to 15 degrees high.  On all but the very hottest days (temps. exceeding 90F), it so far has reported just about what local area weathercasters report.  I have to allow for most of them taking measurements from downtown Portland or the airport, where Columbia River Gorge winds and water commonly vary somewhat from my location, which is about 14 miles southeast among some rolling buttes.  The large maples shown are to the north from which direction wind is least common in summer, so they're not affecting data as much as it might seem.

By cutting slots in the hold-off's pipe brackets, I need only loosen the screws rather than remove them, and the brackets slip up and off.  Then I can just pivot the pipe to one side and down to ground level or onto a portable bench by those berry bushes in the photo, where I can easily remove the head or service it.  Unfortunately the shed eave prevents me from pivoting the other direction, which would be in an even better spot, but it's fine as is.  I've used a ladder onto the shed roof, but it's still a stretch to reach the head;  the pivot down procedure is much easier.

If I'd had a more open and better spot to place a post in cement, I likely would have, but this 20 year old and solid post was already conveniently available.  I used a small bubble level of course, but the old post was already fairly square, so I didn't have to shim the hold-off 2X4, and only had to be careful to get the two upper pipe brackets straight up and down.  Twisting the pipe lightly with a pipe wrench after installation allowed me to adjust the head north and south using a hand compass.

When I get ambitious enough, I'd like to paint the pipe a light green, to make it a little less conspicuous and blend in with the forest and gardens.  I also need to remove the 2X4 hold-off and cut a beveled top on it so water runs off instead of standing on endgrain, and seal or paint it - it'll last longer.




treated 2X4 hold-off with slotted pipe brackets



3/4" elbow pivot point and floor flange mount
(Edited)
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AcuRite Kevin

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hafcanadian,

That is quite an impressive mount!  Great work!