direct, cabled connection?

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Due to the construction of the building, wireless is not going to work for us.  Is there a way to convert the 02064C console to connect directly with the sensor circuit?  I do see some kind of serial port inside the battery compartment on the sensor, as well as four pins right on the transmitter section of the PCB of the sensor.  For the console, there is a data output pin from the receiver.  Is there any pin on the sensor PCB that I can use to connect directly with console to replace the output of the 433 MHz receiver?
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CKMeter

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Posted 3 years ago

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George D. Nincehelser

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The USB port on the sensor is for connecting to a PC.  It won't be of any use for communicating with the sensor.

In theory you could connect the sensor and console, but it you'd really have to tear into them and there are all sorts of issues you'd have to contend with.

I'd look for something like a 433MHz repeater system that you could mount through the wall of the building.    I've never tried one on that frequency, but they're available.  It would be a whole lot simpler.
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CKMeter

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There is a USB port on the console, but I don't think there is one on the sensor.  It looks like a serial port because it is labeled RX and TX and GND, but there is also the fourth one labeled TEST.  I assume it is RS232 type, not USB.  Let me know if I am wrong.

As for the use of repeater, it is not going to be helpful in my specific case.  I prefer cabled version, and will power the sensor via a power cable anyway (I know it only needs to be changed maybe very infrequently).  Unless I have to deal with getting a new firmware for the console, I have the skill to tear into things if needed.
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George D. Nincehelser

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Sorry, I meant the console, not the sensor.  The USB port on the *console* is for connecting to a PC.  Again, it will not be of any use to you communicating with the sensor.

Unless you have a very strong background in the electronics involved, I wouldn't recommend trying to direct-connect the units... there's just too much to go wrong, and there's no documentation to work from.   The consoles are particularly challenging as there are many models.
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CKMeter

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Thank you for the reply, George.

The console has a data input pin, in addition to the USB port like you said.  The data input pin is from the radio receiver module of the console.  If the sensor has a compatible data output that I can use to connect the sensor to the console data input, then I will be a happy camper.  So far, I only see the pin on the sensor for serial purpose (RX, TX, GND) and I will need to get my oscilloscope out and do some probing to see if I can figure the right place to tap into.  I was being lazy and see if anybody know about the right answer already.
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AcuRite Kevin

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Hi CKMeter,

We do not have any options for direct cable connection.  I'm sure you have already realized we also do not support such a method of data transmission.  Officially, our suggestion would be the use of the Aculink Internet Bridge (to monitor on www.acu-link.com), which can be placed at a distance from the router with an extended Ethernet cable run. 

Should you decide to experiment and find a successful method, I am sure other users here would appreciate the information.  Good luck, and if there is anything we can answer for you, please ask.  If it is not proprietary, we will be happy to help you as much as we can.  Have a great day! 
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Matt

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Is the temperature/humidity sensor the only thing on the I2C bus?  Was thinking if I am hard wiring my sensor, it could be nice to sample the sensors more frequently if possible.  I assume the TX/RX/Test connection visible from the battery compartment is some sort of programming header for the microcontroller? I did not see any activity on those pins watching for 60s.
(Edited)
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CKMeter

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It worked.  Connect the ground and the data lines of the receiver and transitter together, and the console was able to acquire the timing and data signal from the sensor.  Much easier to do than VP2 wireless to cabled conversion.  I am going to use the cable to power the sensor, and eliminate the batteries.

The PCB for the sensor is version PSVN4A02-20150526, and the data output pin is the third one from the left between Q10 and Q11.  The PCB for the console is PS1042A02-20150506, and the data input pin is on J1, and labelled DATA.

Do it at your own risk, other standard disclaimers.  I am sure it will void your AcuRite warranty too.
(Edited)
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Matt

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Did you disable the TX or RX radio on either unit? If not, how are you sure they weren't still communicating over the air?
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AcuRite Kevin

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Hi CKMeter,

Glad to see you were successful!  If you have photos you wish to share of your handiwork, I am sure other forum users would appreciate seeing them! 

Have a great day!
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CKMeter

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The description above should be sufficient for those who are interested to try.  I also added the cable power to the sensor from one of the 3.3V VCC pins on the console.  Once I install this on the roof, I will never have to change the battery again.  Hopefully the root rat will stay away from the cable, however.