aspiration fan

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I feel that the solar panels (photvoltaics) on the dual panel version aren't supplying enough power under full sunlight to spin the motor efficiently. And that circuit board might be limiting the power too much from the dual solar panels. 
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HTC159

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Posted 1 year ago

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Jack B McElhaney

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Mine hasn't worked r ight all summer. There are no obstructions. It is acuRIGHT....in the shade.
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George D. Nincehelser

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Acurite did that, Tom.

They changed the motors which could be verified by looking at the wiring.

Complaints dropped dramatically after doing so.
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Dennis

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Is there any way we can retrofit that motor into our 5 in 1?
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Jon008

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You can buy a small dc brushed motor the same size as what is in the unit online, and then you will need to either pull the magnet off, or pull the wind cups off the spindle to get to the wiring from the solar panels etc on the regulator chip. You will need to do some basic soldering.
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AcuRite Rachell, Employee

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Hello Dennis,

We cannot recommend retrofitting different parts into your sensor as it voids the warranty on the product. 
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Dennis

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It's out of warranty, anyway
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jeremy

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A similar problem in mine is due to the insides getting clogged up with spiderwebs. The only fix is to take it apart every few months and clean it. The design needs to change to something with screens to keep bugs and spiders out.
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John Z

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jeremy,

I spray some Ortho Home Defense or Bayer Advanced Home Pest control onto a soft cloth and then wipe the exterior of my 5n1. I do this a couple of times during bug season and find it to be extremely effective.
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jeremy

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Thanks, I'll try that!
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AcuRite Tori

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Hello Jeremy,

We have had some customers spray a light coat of bug spray on the sensor helping with the bug activity as John has recommended. Enjoy your day!

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John Z

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I suggest the soft cloth wipe. Spray might get drawn up into the T&H sensor by the fan. Probably better not to let that happen!
(Edited)
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Jon008

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It works right if the fan is not malfunctioning. When you see temperatures rise and fall faster than a non aspirated sensor, it is because the wind being pulled over the air sensor makes it read the air much faster than a standard sensor. Also, if you have a sensor in the shade, it will not be accurate. You must locate air sensors under an open sky, over the grass away from structures and trees. This means in the sun with a properly constructed solar radiation shield. The 5n1 eliminates this task, and is just plug and play.
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Jon008

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I do perfectly fine without aspiration. If you follow the CWOP guidelines, you can't go wrong. The ones insisting on aspiration are overthinking things.
http://www.wxqa.com/shields.html
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John Z

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Tom, an update on the 7758 fan.
It may be just another brushed motor, potted up in a nice fan housing. Check the reviews on Amazon.
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John Z

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Small brush-less motors/fans have been around a good while (CPU and graphics card fans, for example). Also, they have gotten less expensive as volumes have exploded. Products like UAV drones have opened up a whole new market, with lots of new design points. The problem, as I see it, is in finding an affordable device with the right combination of specs (form factor, air flow, power, drive signal, operating temp.) suitable for use in a PWS. My quick scans suggest that it could be tough. It will be interesting to see if Atlas succeeded in that. If they have, I would count it as a marketable competitive advantage.
(Edited)
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Dennis

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But it is inaccurate as crap!, along with the anemometer!
(Edited)
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Jon008

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If you cannot find the time to devote to keeping the 5n1, or any weather sensor maintained, then maybe this isn't the hobby for you, especially if you are publishing your data to websites. I agree the wind speeds coming out of the sensor tend to be on the low side. I also agree the temperatures tend to run 2 F higher than perhaps it really is. This isn't that far off in reality compared to most brands. Models that cost $1,000 are not perfect by any means.
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Jack B McElhaney

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Jon008, if it were only 2 degrees I would agree. You obviously don't have the problem. I think most of us who DO reflect an average of 10 degrees overstated.
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Jon008

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HEllo Jack,
Have you tried taking the batteries out, and moving the A B C switch around (just change it back and forth a few times) then reinsert batteries, (Alkaline) check temp. Sometimes the air sensor goes out in left field and needs a reboot.
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AcuRite Jennifer

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Hello All,

When the sun is hitting the solar panel you should hear a slight hum coming from the sensor. If you are not hearing this then we would recommend checking  the inside of the sensor for debris or obstructions to the fan. If you find there is nothing obstructing the fan, and have had the sensor less than 1 year we would start a warranty claim on it.

Step 1.
Remove the four outer screws on the bottom of the sensor. Keep the screws for re-assembly.

  • Note: Be careful not to remove or adjust the rain calibration screws located beneath the rain gauge.

Step 2. 
Separate the upper and lower halves of the sensor.

Step 3.
Check the fan for debris, such as insects or spider webs. A gentle puff of air can clear most obstructions safely.

If no debris appears to be blocking the fan, position the top white portion of the sensor (that has the solar panel) in direct, bright sunlight. The fan should power on immediately without any assistance (such as a nudge). Note: Artificial light, such as flashlights, cannot be used as a substitute for actual sunlight. Also, overcast days may not be sunny enough to power on the fan.

Step 4.
To reassemble the sensor, bring the two halves of the sensor back together.

Step 5.
Reinstall the four outer screws to join the upper and lower portions of the sensor together.

For our customers who live in warmer climates we do recommend the dual solar assembly.

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HTC159

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Scientific data shows that a forced ventilated radiation shields do preform better than naturally aspirated (passive) radiation shields in areas that do not receive a constant natural flow of aire across the shield. It is all contingent on where you live. 

The Acu-Rite 5 in 1 sensor is the only forced ventilated sensor I have. The other two I have are Davis WM2 and VP2 Plus that use the passive aspirated radiation shields and those are reasonably accurate to the surrounding area measurements. 
(Edited)

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