AcuRite 13239A1 Atomic Projection Clock with Indoor Temperature time zone issue

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Clock is set for EST yet it is only accurate on AST.  Cost me a couple days of being late for work because I changed the clock to EST and moved it ahead for one hour for Daylight Savings Time and it would convert back to AST.  Can't get anyone from customer service to respond.  Been 8 days.  Funny how they sell time but don't understand time...
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T Miller

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Posted 3 months ago

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John Z

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T Miller,

What time zone are you in? You should be able to leave it set there, with Daylight Savings Time always turned on, and it will take care of itself without your intervention.

https://www.acurite.com/kbase/13239_A...
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joegr

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If it's not receiving the time signal every night, then it can miss the daylight saving time change until it does get signal again.  If you set it to the wrong time zone to compensate for this, then the time will jump ahead an hour (and be wrong again) when it does receive the signal again. 
In some rooms of my house, the atomic clocks get signal and resync every night.  In some other rooms, they only get signal once every several days, and in the rest of the rooms, they never get signal. 
You could try moving your clock closer to a window and further from any other electronic devices.
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John Z

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Joegr,


Transmitter WWVB sends out time data as UTC. All time zone and DST corrections are done within the receiving device. So even if the received signal fluctuates, DST rollover should happen correctly and automatically.

Your advice about signal strength is good, but I do not believe that to be at root of this issue.
(Edited)
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joegr

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Wrong!
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John Z

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Please back that up.
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joegr

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John Z:  I have actually built WWVB time receivers.  It's been a while, but I still remember some of it.  There are two bits in the data stream for daylight savings.  I'd have to go and look up the exact protocol, but it goes something like this.  There are four possible states for the two bits:

Standard time
Switching to daylight savings time tonight.
Daylight savings time
Switching to standard time tonight.

I try very hard to only post stuff that I know to be true.  Apparently, this is not the case for many other people. 

Please read this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WWVB  and then come back and school me some more on it.

Do note that I also have experience with commercial atomic clocks, and I can verify that they use the broadcast daylight savings bits instead of a calendar function, because they do miss the time change if reception is too bad for them to get it.  When I designed the system that I did, I also used the daylight saving bits.  I suspect that most everyone else does for the same reason that I did.  It is better to use them than to hard code it to a date that congress may (and has) change at any time.
 
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joegr

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I never said anything about getting the time zone from the signal.  How would that work.  We know that he (as everyone else does) set the zone manually.  He even said he had to set to the wrong zone to get the right time.  Please go back to the link and scroll down to this section that explains the daylight saving time bits.


:57 2 DST status value (binary):
00 = DST not in effect.
10 = DST begins today.
11 = DST in effect.
01 = DST ends today.

It is data transmitted in the stream that tells the clock if it is daylight savings time or not.  That is what we are discussing here.
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John Z

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OK, joegr,

I see the use of DST bits, and I appreciate the comment about Congressional changes. WWVB does transmit UTC time, though, and time zone and DST corrections are made in the clock. Yes, the DST bits need to be captured. I would expect that a clock has an internal latch such that any valid reception anytime in the day of changeover correctly sets things up for the DST change.

As we know, the 60KHz signal can fluctuate a lot day/night, and clock location is also important. This model includes a signal strength indicator, so any loss of signal should be readily apparent.
(Edited)
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AcuRite Rachell, Employee

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Hello T. Miller,
We are very sorry for any inconvenience you have experienced trying to reach the AcuRite Support Team.  Due to the overwhelming response to the launch of the new AcuRite Access, our call volume has greatly increased. I was not able to locate an email or case under the email addressed used for your forum profile however, I am happy to assist you here. Do you see the RCC Signal Strength bars in the top right corner of your clock?  Please verify you have the DST switch set to ON if Daylight Savings Time effects your location.  Also, please verify you have the correct time zone set on the clock.  When the clock picks up the Atomic signal it will adjust the time to the location that has been set and according to the DST switch located inside the battery compartment.